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(3-95) "Carnton," The McGavock House. Southeast view from the McGavock Confederate Cemetery. Site Marker at entrance to Carnton Plantation: Carnton was built ca. 1815 by Randal McGavock (1768-1843), planter, political leader and mayor of Nashville. Named after the McGavock home in Northern Ireland, the house was greatly enlarged by Randal ca. 1826. His son, John, later added the Greek Revival porches, one of which served as an observation post for Gen. Nathan B. Forrest during the Battle of Franklin, Nov. 30, 1864. After the Battle, Carnton served as a hospital. The bodies of Generals Adams, Cleburne, Granbury, and Strahl rested on the back porch the next morning. Carnton was acquired by the Carnton Association in 1978
 
Historic Carnton Plantation Web Site      
Carnton photos courtesy of Lee Hohenstein, Omaha, NE

(3-95) "Carnton," The McGavock House. View of the back porch from the Confederate Cemetery

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(6-99) Front of the McGavock House

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(6-99) Back porch

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Another view courtesy of Don Worth, Webmaster48th OVVI http://www.48ovvi.org

     

(2007) Enlarge Front gate
 
Photo by Chris Shelton, Indianapolis, IN

 

(3-95) McGavock Confederate Cemetery. Site Marker, TN Historical Commission: Following the Battle of Franklin, Nov. 30, 1864, John McGavock, owner of "Carnton," collected and buried here the bodies of 1496 Confederates. The five general officers killed there were interred elsewhere after being brought to the house. Other Confederates were later buried here, including Brig. Gen. Johnston K. Duncan. Site Marker, Williamson County Historical Society: In the spring of 1866, Col. John McGavock, seeing the deteriorating condition of the Confederate graves on the Franklin battlefield, set aside two acres of Carnton Plantation as the nation's largest private Confederate cemetery. The dead were reinterred here in order by states. In 1890, the wooden markers, which were inscribed with the names of the men, their companies and regiments, when known, were replaced with stone markers. Burial records were preserved by Col. McGavock's wife, the former Carrie Winder. She and her husband maintained the cemetery for the balance of their lives

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