Battle of Lexington, Missouri Page3
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(February 2013) Enlarge   Marker Detail The Battle of Lexington marker (The Anderson House). More marker information
 
Bill Bechmann photo

(2002) On the Western edge of the Federal ramparts stood, and still stands today, the grand, imposing brick home of William Oliver Anderson. The home commanded a panoramic view of the Missouri River valley and prior to the battle was designated as a hospital by Union leaders. But, because of itís strategic position, the house was the site of fierce fighting and changed hands several times throughout the battle.
 
Rich Jordahl photo

          

(2002) The battle scars on the Anderson House, both inside and out, have been preserved. Casualties of the battle were small on both sides, perhaps a tribute to Pricesís patience in conducting the siege operation. Estimates of casualties vary. Union casualties numbered approximately 200, Missouri State Guard casualties were also around 200 but may have actually been higher.
 
Rich Jordahl photo

(2002) A garden and small orchard were maintained by the house residents. The garden became the scene of bloody and intense fighting as each side fought desperately for control of the Anderson House and surrounding area.
 
Rich Jordahl photo

     

(2002) From this point, originally the site of a carriage house and entryway to the Anderson home, soldiers of the Missouri State Guard under General Thomas A. Harris stormed the Union soldiers in and around the house on September 18, the first day of the battle. Throughout the three-day battle State Guard troops moved to surround the fortification erected around Federal headquarters in the old Masonic College building.
 
Rich Jordahl photo

 

(February 2013) Enlarge Position of Confederate General Thomas A. Harris' Division (hemp bales used as cover).
 
Bill Bechmann photo

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