Houston, Texas
Glenwood & Washington Cemeteries

Photos/Text courtesy of William Bozic, Houston, TX
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Links:
1. Glenwood Cemetery, Houston, Texas
2. Glenwood Cemetery (Houston, Texas) - Wikipedia
3. Washington Cemetery
4. Cemeteries & History of Harris Co.,Texas
 

(January 22, 2012) Glenwood Cemetery
 
This country club-like cemetery in Houston Texas is the final resting place of a number of notables. The list of famous reads like a "who's who" for Houston. Howard Hughes is buried here, but many Texas CSA officers are also interred here.

(January 22, 2012) Glenwood Cemetery
 
Col. James B. Likens

Birth: 1829, Morgan County, Georgia,
Death: Sep. 18, 1878 Houston, Harris County, Texas
  
Colonel of the 35th Texas Cavalry. He was so famous the regiment was better known as "Likens" Regiment. Col James B. Likens also served for a time as a brigade commander along the Texas Gulf Coast. James B. Likens and his regiment were very active in the Red River Campaign and fought from Blair's Landing until the end of the campaign, then served along the front lines in Louisiana. His regimental number was a high number due to forming in 1863, yet Likens' 35th Texas Cavalry Regt. retained their horses for much of the war, due to their excellence.
 
James B. Likens was a very important lawyer in civilian life. After the war Likens was elected to the Texas Legislature and served as a very prominent attorney in Galveston, Houston, and Beaumont, where his legal firm practiced.

His service as a young man in the Mexican War is also noted on the grave marker, but unfortunately it tends to obscure his illustrious service as an officer in the Confederate Army and Texas legislator. The grave also fails to mention his command of the important port of Sabine Pass and distinguished service as a Major in another CSA unit before CSA Secretary of War George W. Randolph gave him a direct commission to form his own cavalry regiment and serve as the commander.
 
James B. Likens was presented a sword in Richmond, Virginia on Sept 2, 1862. Source: Diary of a Confederate Congressman 1862-1863: The Diary of Adolphus Sterne edited by Harriet Smither, Southwestern Historical Quarterly 1935 Vol 38 No.3 p.280.
 
Although buried in Houston, Harris County, Texas the Sons of Confederate Veterans Camp 1295 from Beaumont, Texas and order of the Confederate Rose Chapter #11 erected a monument for him on May 12, 2001.
 
Additional information on James B. Likens can be found in the Handbook of Texas and Official Records of the War of the Rebellion.

        

 

(January 22, 2012) Washington Cemetery
 

Located on Washington Road, this cemetery was originally for Germans but has grown to include many other nationalities. The Dick Dowling Camp of the United Confederate Veterans has a plot here and there are many CSA single graves, too. There is also a section for Union graves. All graves are post-war. Efforts continue to mark the graves of veterans.

(January 22, 2012) Washington Cemetery
 
Dick Dowling Camp UCV Plot

The flags and wreath were placed by The Southern Cross Chapter 2502 United Daughters of the Confederacy on Texas Confederate Heroes Day January 22, 2012.
 
This plot is the final resting place of some members of the Dick Dowling Camp and is located in Washington Cemetery, Houston, Harris County, Texas. Notice the flat VA markers placed.
 
On page 3 of the December 18, 1899 issue of The Houston Daily Post, Vol XV, No 258, Monday Morning Edition there is a list of CSA Dead who died post-war.
 
Some cemeteries are listed with those interred while others are just listed as buried in Houston. 

      
 

(January 22, 2012) Washington Cemetery
 
CSA Dead Marker

This marker was place in 1975 in the Dick Dowling UCV Camp plot at Washington Cemetery. A list of those groups involved is located on the marker. Efforts continue to mark the graves of veterans in this cemetery.

   

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