Mosby Heritage Area Tour Page35
August 2007 photos/text courtesy of Richard Edling, PA
   

Wheatland Enlarge
 
After the wounding of Col. Mosby at “Lakeland” the evening of December 21 1864, he was taken by ox-cart to the tenant house at Rockburn, then moved here to recover from the shock of the operation to remove the bullet. He was eventually transported to his parents’ home at McIvor’s Station in Amherst County to convalesce

Marshall
 
Historical marker on Rt. 55

 

     

Frye House, Marshall Va. Enlarge
 
On October 5,1864 Mosby mounted two howitzers on Stephenson’s hill just south of town and commenced shelling Union troops working near the railroad station and their camp. One shot fell short of the station and crashed through the roof of the Frye house, landing in the kitchen. Mr. John M. Frye picked up the unexploded shell and threw it out the door into a group of Union soldiers who immediately took to their heels and departed the area

 

Marshall - Salem Railroad Station
 
Shells from Mosby’s howitzers set afire and destroyed the brick railroad station located here. The Union Army camp was also damaged causing the troops and railroad workers to retreat towards Rectortown with Mosby’s Rangers in hot pursuit

     

Marshall Enlarge
 
Historical marker VA Rt. 55 (eastbound) at Marshall

 

Typical view in the Mosby Heritage Area looking towards Glen Welby where Mosby wrote his farewell address to his men. On April 21,1865 he read it to his men, Enlarge
 

SOLDIERS: I have summoned you together for
the last time. The visions we have cherished of a free
and independent country have vanished, and that country
is now the spoil of the conqueror. I disband your
organization in preference to surrendering it to our
enemies. I am no longer your Commander. After
an association of more than two eventful years, I part
from you with a just pride in the fame of your
achievements and a grateful recollection of your generous
kindness to myself. And at this moment of bidding
you a final adieu, accept the assurance of my unchanging
confidence and regard. Farewell.
JOHN S. MOSBY.

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