Chancellorsville Page7
Following July 2006 Photos Courtesy of Webmaster
   

Waiting Room
 
Jackson's doctors and staff officers both worked and relaxed in this room during the general's stay. Five different physicians examined Jackson, and these men probably discussed their conclusions here over cups of coffee. Chief among the surgeons was Dr. Hunter McGuire. McGuire had amputated Jackson's wounded left arm at a field hospital near Chancellorsville early on May 3. Jackson's chaplain, Beverley Tucker Lacy, then buried the useless limb at Ellwood, a nearby plantation. Lacy comforted the pious Jackson, holding devotions with him daily at Chandler's office. Lacy kept General Lee apprized of the wounded man's condition. At one point, in speaking of Jackson, Lee told Lacy: He has lost his left arm, but I have lost my right arm."
 
Courtesy of NPS "Stonewall" Jackson Shrine tour guide

  

Entrance Hall
 
After a 27-mile ambulance ride, Jackson's aides carried "Stonewall" through this hallway to a room prepared for him by the Chandler's. Jackson endured the long journey remarkably well. Despite the ordeal, he remembered his manners, apologizing to Mr. Chandler for being unable to shake hands with his host
 
Jedediah Hotchkiss, Jackson's topographical engineer, had helped ease his commander's trip by preceding the ambulance with a crew of "pioneers" who removed obstructions from the rough country roads. While treading the wide boards of the Chandler office, Hotchkiss grieved the death of James Keith Boswell, a fellow staff officer killed by the same volley that felled Jackson

Other losses from the Battle of Chancellorsville touched Jackson and those dear to him. General Elisha Franklin Paxton, a neighbor and friend of the Jackson's during their years in Lexington, Virginia, was killed at Chancellorsville on May 3, while leading Jackson's old Stonewall Brigade. Just moments before the doctors allowed Mrs. Jackson to see her wounded husband, she learned of Paxton's death. She had hardly recovered from this shock when she was escorted to her husbands side. There she discovered that he had taken a turn for the worse. Dr. McGuire diagnosed pneumonia; Jackson's condition had become critical
 
Courtesy of NPS "Stonewall" Jackson Shrine tour guide

      

Death Room
 
The Chandler's prepared this room using the same bed frame and one of the same blankets exhibited today. They also added the clock on the mantel to make the room look more homelike and cheerful, but furnishings could not dictate the mood of the room. Three days after his wounding, Jackson began exhibiting symptoms of pneumonia. despite the efforts of the five doctors, nothing seemed to bring him relief. Jackson observed, "I see by the number of physicians that you think my condition dangerous, but I think God, if it is His will, that I am ready to go." On Sunday, May 10, 1863, the doctors lost all hope of Jackson's recovery, and the general was notified of his condition. But while Jackson grew physically weaker, he remained spiritually strong. "It is the Lord's Day; my wish is fulfilled," he said. "I have always desired to die on Sunday." Jackson realized that desire at 3:15 p.m. As his grieving wife and others looked on, the delirious general began barking out commands as if he was once again on the field of battle. Suddenly his voice fell silent. "Presently," wrote McGuire, "a smile of ineffable sweetness spread itself over his pale face, and he said quietly, and with an expression, as if of relief, "Let us cross over the river, and rest under the shade of the trees."
 
Courtesy of NPS "Stonewall" Jackson Shrine tour guide

  Death Room

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